Jeannie Petyarre







Jeannie Petyarre


Born:                c1956
State:               NT 
Region:              Central Desert 
Community:           Utopia 
Outstation:          Alhalkere 
Language:            Anmatyerre 
Social Affiliation:  Petyarre subsectio


Subjects: 
Alkalhere country, dingo, bush turkey, bush tomato, 
centipede, scorpion, medicine leaves.

Medium:     Batik on silk, Acrylic on canvas


Collections: 
The National Gallery of Australia, Canberra.
The Holmes a Court Collection, Perth. 



Group Exhibitions:
1989, Utopia Women's Paintings, the First Works on Canvas, A Summer Project, 
1988-89, S. H. Ervin Gallery, Sydney; 
1990, 'Utopia - A Picture Story,' an exhibition of 88 works on silk from the 
Holmes a Court Collection by Utopia artists which toured Eire and Scotland.; 
1993, Central Australian Aboriginal Art and Craft Exhibition, Araluen Centre, Alice Springs 



Bibliography:
 
Brody, A., 1989, Utopia Women's Paintings: the First Works on Canvas, A Summer Project, 
1988-89, exhib. cat., Heytesbury Holdings, Perth. (C) ; 

Brody, A., 1990, Utopia: a Picture Story, 88 Silk Batiks from the Robert Holmes a Court 
Collection, Heytesbury Holdings Ltd, Perth. (C)

 
Details:
Jeannie was born in 1956 to a family of well-known artists. She is the sister of the well 
known Gloria Petyarre, Kathleen Petyarre, Ada Bird Petyarre, Violet Petyarre, Myrtle Petyarre 
and Nancy Petyarre. Jeannie started painting batik work in the eighties. She paints leaves 
like her sister Gloria Petyarre, but also Bush Medicine Dreaming, Bush Peanut Dreaming, 
Mountain Devil Lizard (arnkerrthe) Dreaming, Yam Seed Dreaming and she, like her sister, 
is known for the use of vibrant colours. 

Jeannie paints bush tucker stories, such as yams and yam root systems. Her work is 
characterised by vibrant designs celebrating the spirit of the Yam plant as it generates 
year after year to feed the people. This colourful style was taught to her by her Aunt, 
the famous Emily Kame Kngwarreye, who told Jeannie before she died that she must continue 
to paint the family's Yam Dreaming.









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