Maureen Hudson Nampajinpa











Maureen Hudson Nampajinpa


Dob:            8 / 1959
Place:          MT. ALLEN 50 KM. E of Yuendumu.
Area:           Yuendumu,  NW  Alice Springs, Central Australia.
Language:       Warlpiri.
Tribe:          Warlpiri.
Parents:        Anmatyerre / Warlpiri.

Dreamings:  	Bush Onion, Women's Ceremonies, 
	          Flying Ant, Fire, Water and Possum.


Exhibitions	
5/92 "Central Australian Art" held at the Art Dock in Noumea 
8/92 Sand Paintings of the Central Desert held at the Centre 
	 for Aboriginal Art in Alice.
9/93 "Commitments" held at the Museum of Modern Art in Brisbane Qld. 
4/94 "Dreamings" held at Tribal Art Gallery, Flinders Lane, 
	 Melbourne, Victoria. This was a joint exhibition of Hudson 
	 and Clifford Possum paintings. 
9/94 An exhibition was held at a regional Winery/Gallery in 
	 Mt Atkin in Victoria. 
6/95 "Dreamings of the Desert" held at lJluru Gallery, Ayers Rock, NT. 
3/97 "Desert Dreams" held at tlle National Aboriginal Cultural 
	 Institute, Adelaide SA. 
10/97 Upcoming - "Women Dreaming" Gallery 47  London UK "Songlines" 
	 Boulder,Colorado USA  


Collections:  	
Tribal Art Gallery,  Melbourne. 
Museum of Modern Art Brisbane.
Alice Springs Galleries and private collections.


Details
Born at Mt. Ellen of Anmatyerre / Warlpiri descent, her country 
is Mt. Wedge and Mt. Ellen (Kerrinyarra). Maureen's father had 
2 wives, Rosie and Lena who were sisters. Rosie had 2 children, 
Allan Norman and Jean Nampajinpa. Lena had 4 children, Maureen, 
Micha, Emily and Judith.

Maureen's father passed away in 1972 when Maureen was 12 years 
old. Her mother (Lena) re-married to Peter Brown Jungala and 
had another 5 children. 

Maureen was educated at Yuendumu Settlement and latter returned 
to Mt. Allen and worked as a teacher's aid for three years and 
has 4 children, Michael, Jillian, Gwenda and Anderson Turner. 
Began painting in 1981 and was encouraged to pursue a full time 
career as an artist after observing the work of senior artists 
for years, and like her older sister, JEAN HUDSON Nampajinpa, 
began to paint regularly for herself. The demand for her art work 
has steadily increased over the years and she has now emerged as 
a painter in her own right.







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